I started my career in tech back in the 90th in the tiny IT company of my father. I took over the software related tasks and that brought me ever deeper into coding. With my passion in technology and business I graduated in Business-Administration, Innovation-Management and took multiple IT courses e.g. Stanford and Harvard to strengthen my knowledge. Currently I have a little freelance business, but spend most of my time as full-time employee at the consultancy Monstarlab. References: - Certified Blockchain Solutions Architect - Certified: OpenJS Node.js Application Developer - Microsoft® Certified Professional - Hackathon enthusiast - Technical Account Manager for Telefonica, Warner Bros.® and Media-Saturn-Holding - Project Manager for NGOs e.g. UNICEF

My Mentoring Topics

  • Solution and Software Architecture
  • Artificial Intelligence Developer
  • Leading (remote) Teams
  • Effective Communication
  • IT Strategy
  • Scrum
  • System Design
  • Health
R.
18.July 2024

I had an outstanding session with Ingo. When it comes to tech and mentoring, Ingo is the right person for you. He was able to help me with all my concerns or give me valuable input. Anyone who needs mentoring for tech or product is in the right place with Ingo.

O.
13.June 2024

Ingo is an absolute legend when it comes to tech and mentoring! His passion for software and staying on top of the latest technologies is inspiring. He's always trying out new tech and finding ways to improve his skills. As a mentor, Ingo is super supportive and non-judgmental. He’s always ready to help and share his knowledge. If you're looking for someone who’s not just an expert but also incredibly enthusiastic and approachable. Reach him out! I can’t wait for more opportunities to collaborate with him! Thanks for everything, Ingo!

D.
1.May 2024

Danke für die Session! Hat mich gefreut, dich kennenzulernen. Deine Expertise als CTO & Teamleitung hat mir sehr weitergeholfen. Wir werden auf jeden Fall weiterhin in Kontakt bleiben.

P.
29.October 2023

I had an opportunity to be a mentee of Ingo. We had a friendly conversation and I must say it was very helpful. Ingo has shared plenty of things with me about software architecture, solution design, etc and lots of other things too. He gave me resources to learn, as well as recommended some books. Really glad to be connected with Ingo and I would like to thank him for his valuable advice. You can go through his article linked https://ingoeichhorst.medium.com/learn-to-code-as-a-technology-manager-61da0ed81479 I would recommend you to have a session with him. Looking forward for my next. I would also thank mentoring-club for the creating such a good platform.

X.
31.January 2022

It was really helpful getting things from a senior management perspective. High level concerns around product and team. Will definitely reach out in the future for advice!

A.
9.November 2021

It was great talking to you about goal setting or interviewing. The conversation was very easy for me and I felt that I had someone in front of me who was willing to help. Not only that, I keep thanking you for being willing to help me with the interviews even before we had our call. It was very very nice. In short, it helped me a lot to talk about doing one thing at one time with someone who is enthusiastic and from whom I can learn a lot. THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME! And I hope to tell you in the next few weeks "Ingo I have a job! Now I just want advice on the next three thousand steps!" haha Have a nice day! Ana

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The Phoenix Project - A Novel about IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win
Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, George Spafford

Key Facts and Insights from "The Phoenix Project" The Three Ways: The first principle, known as "The flow of work from left to right," emphasizes the need for work to be visualized and flow smoothly from development to operations to the customer. The second principle, "Amplify feedback loops," underscores the importance of creating channels for necessary adjustments. The third principle, "Continual experimentation and learning," promotes a culture of continual experimentation, taking risks, and learning from failure. DevOps: The book emphasizes the critical role of DevOps in modern IT operations and how it can help businesses win. DevOps represents the integration of development and operations teams to deliver better, faster, and more reliable outcomes. IT as a competitive advantage: The book argues that IT is no longer just a support function but a strategic asset that can provide a competitive advantage when managed effectively. Importance of Visibility: The book stresses the importance of visibility in IT operations. It emphasizes the need for clear visibility of work-in-progress, flow, and feedback to reduce wastage and increase efficiency. Work in Progress (WIP): The book highlights the dangers of excessive WIP and how it can lead to burnout and inefficiency. It recommends limiting WIP to improve flow and efficiency. Technical Debt: The book discusses the concept of technical debt and how neglecting it can lead to long-term inefficiencies and increased costs. Value of IT operations: The book underscores the value that IT operations bring to a business, emphasizing the need for organizations to invest in their IT operations. Culture of Learning: The book advocates for a culture of learning where failures are seen as opportunities for learning, not blame. Infrastructure as Code (IaC): The book introduces the concept of Infrastructure as Code, a key DevOps practice that involves managing and provisioning computer data centers through machine-readable definition files, rather than physical hardware configuration or interactive configuration tools. Automation: The Phoenix Project highlights the importance of automation in reducing errors, freeing up human resources, and increasing efficiency and productivity. Managing Bottlenecks: The book discusses the Theory of Constraints and how managing bottlenecks in any process can improve overall performance. In-depth Analysis "The Phoenix Project" presents a compelling case for the integration of development and operations teams through a method known as DevOps. This critical shift in IT operations management can best be understood through the lens of The Three Ways. The first way emphasizes the need for work to flow smoothly from development to operations to the customer, a principle that is at the heart of DevOps. The second way underscores the importance of creating channels for necessary adjustments or feedback. This feedback loop is an integral part of the DevOps culture as it helps teams to identify and rectify issues promptly, thereby improving the quality of outcomes. The third way promotes a culture of continual experimentation, learning, and understanding that failure is a part of this process. The authors, Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, and George Spafford, argue convincingly that IT is no longer just a support function but a strategic asset that can provide a competitive advantage when managed effectively. This is a significant shift from traditional perspectives and places IT at the heart of business strategy. The book also emphasizes the importance of visibility in IT operations. It is essential to have clear visibility of work-in-progress, flow, and feedback to reduce wastage and increase efficiency. In this context, the book introduces the concept of technical debt, which refers to the future cost of correcting shortcuts taken in system development or maintenance today. If neglected, technical debt can lead to long-term inefficiencies and increased costs. One of the key insights from the book is the dangers of excessive Work in Progress (WIP). Too much WIP can lead to burnout and inefficiency. To address this, the authors recommend limiting WIP to improve flow and efficiency. This is a core principle of lean and agile methodologies, which aim to reduce waste and increase the delivery speed. The Phoenix Project also introduces the concept of Infrastructure as Code (IaC), a key practice in DevOps. IaC involves managing and provisioning computer data centers through machine-readable definition files, rather than physical hardware configuration or interactive configuration tools. This is a significant shift from traditional IT operations and provides a more efficient and reliable approach to managing infrastructure. Automation is another key theme in the book. The authors highlight the importance of automation in reducing errors, freeing up human resources, and increasing efficiency and productivity. This is a key practice in DevOps, where the aim is to automate as much of the software delivery pipeline as possible. Finally, the authors discuss the Theory of Constraints and how managing bottlenecks in any process can improve overall performance. This is an essential principle in operations management and is particularly relevant in the context of IT operations, where bottlenecks can significantly hinder the delivery speed. In conclusion, "The Phoenix Project" provides a compelling case for adopting DevOps and rethinking the role of IT in business strategy. The principles and practices discussed in the book have the potential to transform IT operations and help businesses win in a competitive environment.

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The Unicorn Project - A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data
Gene Kim

Key Insights from "The Unicorn Project" Five Ideals: The book introduces five ideals that are crucial for the success of any project. These are Locality and Simplicity, Focus, Flow, and Joy, Improvement of Daily Work, Psychological Safety, and Customer Focus. Value of Developers: The book highlights the importance of developers in the digital era and how they can cause disruptions and innovations in the industry. Data Centricity: Data is the new oil. The book accentuates the significance of data and how it can be utilized to thrive in the current age. Communication and Collaboration: The importance of effective communication and collaboration between different departments in an organization is emphasized. Technical Debt: The book discusses the concept of technical debt and how it can hinder the progress of a project if not managed properly. Psychological Safety: The novel underscores the need for psychological safety in a working environment. The team members should feel safe to take risks and communicate openly. Importance of Automation: The book sheds light on the role and importance of automation in achieving efficiency and speed in projects. Customer Centricity: The importance of keeping the customer at the center of all decisions and development is highlighted. Leadership: The book underlines the role of effective leadership in driving the successful execution of projects. Continuous Learning: The emphasis is laid on the importance of continual learning for staying relevant in the ever-evolving tech world. DevOps and Agile methodologies: The book discusses the use of DevOps and Agile methodologies for efficient project management and execution. Analysis of "The Unicorn Project" "The Unicorn Project" by Gene Kim is a business novel that provides significant insights into the world of software development and digital disruption. It is a sequel to his previous book "The Phoenix Project", and it continues the conversation around DevOps, this time with a focus on the developer's perspective. The book is centered around the character of Maxine, a senior lead developer and architect, who gets exiled to the Phoenix Project, which is considered a disaster. The narrative follows her journey as she navigates through the complexities and challenges, ultimately leading her team towards success. In this journey, the author introduces us to the "Five Ideals" which are core principles for success in any organization. The first two ideals, Locality and Simplicity and Focus, Flow, and Joy, resonate with the concept of Agile methodologies, which emphasize breaking down complex tasks into simpler ones, focusing on one task at a time, and maintaining a steady flow of work. It shows how these principles can lead to joy in work, which is essential for productivity and innovation. The next ideal, Improvement of Daily Work, is in line with the concept of Kaizen, a Japanese term for continuous improvement. It suggests how improving daily work is even more important than doing the daily work. The idea here is to maintain a culture of constant learning and improvement, and this can be done by encouraging experimentation, rewarding innovative ideas, and learning from failures. In the fourth ideal, Psychological Safety, the author emphasizes the need for creating an environment where team members feel safe in taking risks and expressing their thoughts. This is crucial for innovation and creativity. It aligns with the concept of Transformational Leadership, where leaders encourage open communication, promote risk-taking, and foster creativity. The last ideal, Customer Focus, aligns with the concept of Customer Centricity. It highlights the importance of keeping the customer at the center of all decisions and developments. This ideal is crucial in the era of digital disruption, where customer preferences and expectations are rapidly changing. The book also discusses the importance of effectively managing technical debt, which can be a significant obstacle in software development if not addressed timely. It further highlights the importance of automation in achieving efficiency and speed, which is a key aspect of DevOps. In conclusion, "The Unicorn Project" provides valuable insights into the best practices for software development and project management in the age of digital disruption. It emphasizes the importance of developers, data, communication, collaboration, leadership, continuous learning, and customer focus for the success of any project. The concepts and methodologies discussed in this book can be incredibly beneficial for anyone looking to thrive in the ever-evolving tech world.

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