Passionate lifescience industry professional with diverse experience spanning pharmaceuticals, biotechnology systems, and medical device development. Versatile in roles such as Business Analyst, Technical Writer, Requirements Engineer, and Product Owner. Holds certifications from Stanford University School of Medicine in Digital Health Product Development and Evaluation of AI for Healthcare. Eager to share experiences and insights with career starters to help them grow. Empathetic, optimistic, and self-motivated. Enjoys sports, networking, and building connections in free time.

My Mentoring Topics

  • Life Science Industry Knowlege sharing
  • Navigating Different Career path
  • Personality development
G.
21.May 2024

A.
18.May 2024

I had a productive mentoring session with Safique, where I learned how to effectively apply related to my field. The session provided me with valuable skills, and I am now committed to investing more time in developing and practicing these skills. Safique's guidance has been instrumental in enhancing my understanding, and I look forward to continuing my growth through these sessions.

N.
9.May 2024

Sadique is an exceptional mentor who provides clear guidance and support. He patiently addressed all my doubts, outlining each step for effective preparation. His humility and approachability made our session comfortable and productive. I'm grateful for his invaluable assistance and eagerly anticipate our next meeting.

Mindset - The New Psychology of Success
Carol S. Dweck

Key Insights from "Mindset - The New Psychology of Success" The dichotomy of growth and fixed mindsets: The book explores the concept of two essential mindsets - growth and fixed. A fixed mindset believes abilities are static, while a growth mindset embraces challenges and sees them as opportunities for learning and growth. The power of belief: It emphasizes the power of our beliefs, particularly our beliefs about our abilities. It shows how changing even the simplest of beliefs can have a profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. Effort as a path to mastery: The book suggests that effort is not just about hard work but is also a means to mastery and success. It is the growth mindset that helps us to perceive effort as a positive, not a burden. Handling failure: The book teaches how to handle failures. From a growth mindset perspective, failure is not a proof of unintelligence but an inspiring learning opportunity that paves the way for growth and development. The importance of attitude: The book underscores that having a positive attitude and a growth mindset can lead to success and satisfaction in life. It is not our abilities or intelligence that brings success, but our approach towards learning and handling challenges. Success is about learning, not proving: The book posits that success is about learning, not proving how smart we are. It is about stretching ourselves to learn something new and to develop our abilities. Impact on relationships: The book discusses how our mindset affects our relationships and interactions with others. It argues that a fixed mindset can lead to a desire to prove oneself, and this can potentially damage relationships. Teaching and parenting: The book provides insights into how parents, teachers, and coaches can cultivate a growth mindset in children. It presents strategies for praising kids in ways that promote a growth mindset. Business applications: The book also explores how these concepts can be applied in a business setting to foster a culture of learning and resilience. Changing mindsets: Finally, the book provides guidance on how to shift from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset and how to apply this change in various areas of life. An In-Depth Summary and Analysis of "Mindset - The New Psychology of Success" In "Mindset - The New Psychology of Success", psychologist Carol S. Dweck presents a transformative view on success and achievement by focusing on the concept of mindset. Dweck introduces two different mindsets - the fixed mindset and the growth mindset. The fixed mindset is the belief that our abilities, intelligence, and talents are fixed traits that cannot change. People with a fixed mindset often feel the need to prove their intelligence or abilities and see failure as a direct reflection of their abilities. On the other hand, the growth mindset is the belief that abilities and intelligence can be developed over time through hard work, dedication, and a love for learning. People with a growth mindset see failures as opportunities for learning and growth, not as a reflection of their abilities. The book emphasizes that the power of belief can shape our lives significantly. If we believe that we can develop our abilities, we behave differently than if we believe our abilities are fixed. This perspective shift can have a profound impact on almost every aspect of our life, from personal relationships to professional success. Dweck further discusses the role of effort in achieving mastery. She argues that effort is not merely about hard work; it's the means through which we learn, grow, and master our skills. It's the growth mindset that allows us to see effort as a positive aspect of learning rather than a burden. The book also addresses the importance of handling failure. From a growth mindset perspective, failure is not a sign of unintelligence but a beneficial learning opportunity. This perspective encourages resilience and persistence in the face of setbacks and challenges. The author underscores the importance of attitude in shaping our lives. She posits that it's not our abilities or intelligence that brings success, but our approach towards learning and handling challenges. Dweck also emphasizes that success is about learning, not proving how smart we are. It's about stretching ourselves to learn something new, developing our abilities, and not being afraid of making mistakes along the way. The book also discusses how our mindset affects our relationships with others. A fixed mindset, with its inherent need to prove oneself, can potentially damage relationships. On the other hand, a growth mindset fosters stronger, healthier relationships based on mutual growth and learning. Dweck also sheds light on how parents, teachers, and coaches can cultivate a growth mindset in children. She suggests strategies for praising kids in ways that promote a growth mindset, such as praising effort and improvement rather than innate talent or intelligence. The book also explores how these concepts can be applied in a business setting. A growth mindset fosters a culture of learning, resilience, and continuous improvement, which are key to business success. Finally, Dweck provides guidance on how to shift from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. She offers practical strategies and steps to apply this change in various areas of life, fostering personal and professional growth. In conclusion, "Mindset - The New Psychology of Success" offers a powerful paradigm for personal and professional development. It presents a transformative perspective on success, achievement, and personal growth, grounded in decades of psychological research. The book's core message is a testament to the power of our beliefs and the potential for change and growth inherent in us all.

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HOW TO WIN FRIENDS & INFLUENCE PEOPLE
Dale Carnegie

Key Insights from "How to Win Friends & Influence People" Importance of Genuine Interest: One must genuinely be interested in other people and show it. This is the first step towards winning people over. Appreciate Others: Sincere appreciation, not flattery, is a key to winning people's hearts. People crave for appreciation and recognition. Remembering Names: Remembering and using people's names in conversations is a simple yet powerful technique to make people feel valued and important. Listening: Effective listening and encouraging others to talk about themselves is a sure shot way to make friends. Avoid Arguments: Arguments lead to resentment and damage relationships. Carnegie suggests that we should never argue, but instead always agree and understand the other person's point of view. Admit Mistakes: Admitting our mistakes quickly and emphatically makes others respect us more. Nobody is perfect and recognizing this fact builds trust and respect. Encourage Others: Encouraging others to excel, acknowledging their strengths and motivating them to improve their weaknesses is a great way to influence people. Respect Others' Opinions: Even if we disagree, we must respect other's opinions. This shows our maturity and understanding and helps build strong relationships. Understanding Human Nature: Understanding that people primarily care about themselves and their needs, and tailoring our approach accordingly is fundamental to influencing people. Positive Reinforcement: Using positive reinforcement and encouragement instead of criticism to change people's behavior is more effective and less damaging. Role of Empathy: Trying to see the situation from the other person's perspective and showing empathy can greatly improve our relationships. Analysis of Content "How to Win Friends & Influence People" is a timeless masterpiece by Dale Carnegie that delves into the fundamental principles of human interactions. The book, published in 1936, continues to be a top seller and is considered a must-read for anyone interested in improving their interpersonal skills. The book is divided into four parts, each focusing on a key aspect of interpersonal relations - fundamental techniques in handling people, six ways to make people like you, how to win people to your way of thinking, and how to change people without giving offence or arousing resentment. Carnegie starts by emphasizing the importance of a genuine interest in others. People are naturally drawn to those who show interest in them. This is not about feigning interest, but about cultivating a genuine curiosity about others and their lives. This concept aligns with the psychological theory of Reciprocity of Liking, which suggests that we tend to like people who show that they like us. The importance of appreciation cannot be overstated. Carnegie states that "the deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated." This is backed by numerous studies showing that appreciation and recognition have a significant impact on employee motivation and job satisfaction. Remembering and using people's names is a simple but effective strategy. As Dale Carnegie states, "a person’s name is to that person, the sweetest, most important sound in any language." Using someone's name during conversation makes them feel seen and valued, and fosters a sense of connection. Carnegie's advice on effective listening and encouraging others to talk about themselves is in line with modern psychological research which shows that active listening increases likability and fosters deeper connections. Avoiding arguments, admitting mistakes, and respecting others' opinions are all part of Carnegie's conflict resolution strategies. These align with the principles of Nonviolent Communication, a communication process developed by psychologist Marshall Rosenberg. Carnegie emphasizes the role of positive reinforcement and encouragement instead of criticism to change people's behavior. This is in line with the principles of Operant Conditioning, a type of learning where behavior is strengthened or weakened by the consequence that follows it. Finally, Carnegie underscores the importance of empathy - trying to see the situation from the other person's perspective. This is a fundamental principle in Emotional Intelligence, a concept popularized by psychologist Daniel Goleman. In conclusion, "How to Win Friends & Influence People" is a seminal work that combines timeless wisdom with a deep understanding of human nature. Its principles, backed by modern psychological research, offer practical advice to improve our interpersonal skills and relationships.

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